Lakeside Guide to Lake Chapala, Ajijic, Mexico

Mexican Cooking Classes

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Take a gastronomic trip through Mexico’s traditional foods with chef Ayrton Ruvalcaba.

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Take a culinary trip across Mexico with chef Ayrton Ruvalcaba and this series of Mexican cooking classes in Ajijic.

Ayrton is the chef at Dharma, which specializes in Mexican and Asian cuisine. The restaurant is located inside Casa Colón Concept House.

Each cooking class starts at 2 p.m. with a discussion about the history of the recipe and is followed by an in-depth demonstration. You’ll be taken through each step of the recipe, with lots of back and forth between you and the chef along the way.

It ends with everyone eating what they just made and includes a free drink from the bar.

The classes are divided into two groups, soups and emblematic dishes:

  • Pozole – July 17, 2019
  • Caldo tlalpeño – July 31, 2019
  • Caldo de albóndigas – August 14, 2019
  • Caldo espinazo – August 28, 2019
  • Nayarit-style seafood cocktail – September 11, 2019
  • Chiles en nogada – September 25, 2019
  • Enchiladas suizas – October 9, 2019
  • Mole and enmoladas – October 23, 2019
  • Tacos de pastor – November 6, 2019
  • Vegan tacos with Mexican fillings – November 20, 2019

Classes are limited to 20 people. The cost is $650 pesos per class, with group discounts for five or more people at $490. Register for classes by calling 332-794-6101, emailing dharmaajijic@gmail.com or messaging them via Facebook.

Last updated August 9, 2019

Dane Strom

Dane Strom The Lakeside Guide

I moved to Ajijic in 2010 when I decided to quit my job of seven years as an editorial assistant at The Denver Post in Colorado. I'm the photographer, web designer, programmer, marketer, writer... the everything behind this website, The Lakeside Guide. All of the businesses on this website appear here for free at no cost to them. Learn more about The Lakeside Guide or check out my other website about photography of Mexico.

Street View

Address

Inside Dharma: Colón #29

Ajijic

Phone

332-794-6101

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Photos of Mexican Cooking Classes

A bowl of classic red pozole, which is a pork and hominy soup. It's the most common regional variety of one of Mexico's most popular dishes.

A bowl of classic red pozole, which is a pork and hominy soup. It's the most common regional variety of one of Mexico's most popular dishes.

Chef Ayton Ruvalcaba goes over the recipe for pozole at the start of class.

Chef Ayton Ruvalcaba goes over the recipe for pozole at the start of class.

Classes include the history of the recipe and the ingredients that are used.

Classes include the history of the recipe and the ingredients that are used.

Pozole starts with the process of nixtamalización, which consists of submerging special varieties of white or purple corn in water and slaked lime for 24 hours.

Pozole starts with the process of nixtamalización, which consists of submerging special varieties of white or purple corn in water and calcium hydroxide (slaked lime).

The corn starts out dried, on the left, and ends up the perfect consistency about 24 hours later.

The corn starts out dried, on the left, and ends up the perfect consistency about 24 hours later.

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Frida Kahlo Catrina

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Purchase This Fine Art Print
The dried corn before being nixtamalizado.

The dried corn before being nixtamalizado.

After spending 24 hours in the solution, the corn is now soft and now edible. According to Pre-Columbian Foodways (2009), the earliest found evidence of nixtamalización is from Guatemala around 1500 BC.

After spending 24 hours in the solution, the corn is now soft, edible and more nutritious than it was before. According to Pre-Columbian Foodways (2009), the earliest found evidence of nixtamalización is from Guatemala around 1500 BC.

Pork is usually the meat that goes with the red variety of pozole. It's cooked for a few hours along with onion and garlic.

Pork is usually the meat that goes with the red variety of pozole. Leg, spine and skin are common cuts. It's cooked for a few hours along with onion and garlic.

Mexican bay leaves are also thrown into the pot.

Mexican bay leaves are also thrown into the pot.

Pata -- foot -- is also a cut that's used in pozole.

Pata -- foot -- is also a cut that's used in pozole.

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Chef Ruvalcaba removes the meat after it's finished cooking.

Chef Ruvalcaba removes the meat after it's finished cooking.

Spine.

Spine.

Pierna is shredded by hand to create pulled pork.

Pierna is shredded by hand to create pulled pork.

The pig's feet and skin were cooked separately and the fat skimmed off the top.

The pig's feet and skin were cooked separately and the fat skimmed off the top.

Red pozole gets its color, and some of its flavor, from red chiles, usually guajillos in this area of Mexico.

Red pozole gets its color, and some of its flavor, from red chiles, usually guajillos in this area of Mexico.

To make the red salsa for the pozole, the chiles are first deseeded and deveined.

To make the red salsa for the pozole, the chiles are first deseeded and deveined.

The chiles are dried and need to be rehydrated before they can be blended into a sauce.

The chiles are dried and need to be rehydrated before they can be blended into a sauce.

Boiling water is added to the chiles until they are completely submerged.

Boiling water is added to the chiles until they are completely submerged.

They're left, along with some cloves of garlic, for about ten minutes until they're fully reconstituted.

They're left, along with some cloves of garlic, for about ten minutes until they're fully reconstituted.

Now they're much thicker and ready to be blended with other ingredients to make the non-spicy salsa that will be added to the pozole.

Now they're much thicker and ready to be blended with other ingredients to make the non-spicy salsa that will be added to the pozole.

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Purchase This Fine Art Print
Adding the chiles and garlic to the blender.

Adding the chiles and garlic to the blender.

The chiles and garlic are blended until liquified.

The chiles and garlic are blended until liquified.

To thin the sauce a bit, the chef adds some of the chile liquid that's left over from the rehydration process.

To thin the sauce a bit, the chef adds some of the chile liquid that's left over from the rehydration process.

After blending for several minutes, it's necessary to pass the sauce through a sieve.

After blending for several minutes, it's necessary to pass the sauce through a sieve.

The sieve removes the tough outer surface of the chile which can't be completely broken down by the blender.

The sieve removes the tough outer surface of the chile which can't be completely broken down by the blender.

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The guajillo sauce ready to be added to the rest of the pozole.

The guajillo sauce ready to be added to the rest of the pozole.

The lime needs to be washed off of the corn after it's finished its 24-hour soak.

The lime needs to be washed off of the corn after it's finished its 24-hour soak.

Then the corn is ready to be added to the pot of meat and broth.

Then the corn is ready to be added to the pot of meat and broth.

More water is added until there is about ten liters total of liquid.

More water is added until there is about ten liters total of liquid.

The guajillo sauce is then added.

The guajillo sauce is then added.

Sliced radishes are one of the common garnishes that go on top of a bowl of pozole.

Sliced radishes are one of the common garnishes that go on top of a bowl of pozole.

Diced onions, too, usually go on top.

Diced onions, too, usually go on top.

Cabbage is another common garnish.

Cabbage is another common garnish.

And finally, a squeeze of lime is an essential part of a bowl of pozole.

And finally, a squeeze of lime is an essential part of a bowl of pozole.

Pozole is not usually spicy since the chiles which are used are mild and are added mostly for flavor, not for heat. So pozole is usually accompanied by a side of hot sauce made from these chiles de árbol.

Pozole is not usually spicy since the chiles which are used are mild and are added for flavor, not for heat. So pozole is usually accompanied by a side of hot sauce made from these chiles de árbol.

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Like the guajillos, these chiles need to be rehydrated, too, before being turned into a sauce.

Like the guajillos, these chiles need to be rehydrated, too, before being turned into a sauce.

Blending the chiles.

Blending the chiles.

After heating everything to a boil, the pozole is ready to serve.

After heating everything to a boil, the pozole is ready to serve.

Pozole, along with the usual garnishes of tostadas, lime, cabbage, radish, onion and hot sauce.

Pozole, along with the usual garnishes of tostadas, lime, cabbage, radish, onion and hot sauce.

A finished bowl of pozole.

A finished bowl of pozole.

Mexican Cooking Classes

Chef Ayrton Ruvalcaba of Dharma with two students.

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Ismael's Molcajete

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Ismael Sánchez displays his well-worn molcajete in the kitchen of his Ajijic home.

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Purchase This Fine Art Print

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